Biographies

M. Scott Brumback

M. Scott Brumback

M. Scott Brumback was born in Michigan. Scott enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1979 as an armored crewman. He was stationed at Fort Knox, Kentucky, Augsburg, Germany, and Fort Carson, Colorado, and rose to the rank of Sergeant. After four years in the Army, Scott attended Michigan State University. He earned degrees in Political Science and German. Scott then attended Case Western Reserve University School of Law and graduated in 1991 with his Juris Doctorate. After a short stint in private practice, Scott took a position with the Yakima County Prosecuting Attorney's office. Here Scott was able to try many cases before juries and the bench. In 1995, Scott went to work for the City of Yakima Legal Department. Again, Scott's focus was on handling criminal trials. Then in 1998, Scott joined the personal injury law firm of Wiley Hurst & Associates. In 2000, Scott became a partner in the Hurst firm where he continues to focus on the needs of people injured in personal injury and on-the-job accidents. In addition to his private law practice, Scott has also kept active in the military. Presently, Scott has over 20 years of military experience. After having spent more than 11 years as an armored crewman (and tank commander) while rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant, Scott now serves as a JAG officer in the U.S. Army (Reserves). He has traveled with the U.S. Army to Germany and South Korea in addition to stateside assignments. Scott has also served as a Judge pro tempore in Yakima County District Court. Scott is a member of the Washington State Bar Association, The Washington State Trial Lawyers Association, the Yakima County Bar Association and the National Rifle Association. Scott is admitted to practice law in Washington State and the United States District Court, Eastern District of Washington.

Sidney P. Ottem

Sidney P. Ottem

Born and raised in Western Nebraska , Sid worked on family-owned farms while growing up. This experience was formative to him in many ways including an appreciation for the area's natural resources and the value of hard work. Sid attended Brown University in 1984 in Providence, R.I. after his recruitment to play football there and several other schools. He graduated Brown with a degree in English and American Literature. He selected the University of Oregon to take advantage of its duo degree in Law along with a Master's program in Environmental Science. Sid graduated from the University of Oregon School of Law in 1992 and obtained a position working in Yakima County Superior Court for the Honorable Walter Stauffacher and F. James Gavin as a Staff Attorney on the stream adjudication of the Yakima Basin. Sid would eventually manage that litigation (the largest and longest running litigation in the history of Washington State) as a judicial officer beginning in 1999 until its near completion in 2008.

Sid joined the United States Department of the Interior as a managing attorney in Albuquerque, NM and Washington D.C. from 2008 until 2015 working on Natural Resource law issues, personal injury claims against the government and numerous other areas. Sid has published numerous articles and lectured at law schools, universities and legal education seminars. While in Yakima, Sid married a local girl (Kimberly Zerr) and enjoyed raising a son and two daughters. However, because of an injury to his wife and the impact on his family along with Sid's legacy working on farms and ranches, he decided to return to Yakima to work with injured people. Joining Scott and the Brumback Law Group presented a great opportunity in light of shared Midwestern values, Scott's outstanding ethics and the firm's philosophy of assisting the hardworking people of the Yakima Valley. Sid is a member of the Washington State Bar.

Wiley Hurst

Wiley Hurst

Wiley was born in 1936 at Farwell Texas. When he was very young, his father moved the family to Yakima, Washington to work in the fruit orchards. Shortly after they arrived in Yakima, Wiley's father was killed in an orchard accident. This single event truly remained with Wiley throughout his life.

Wiley attended high school at Yakima High School and graduated in 1954. He then worked as a caddy at the Yakima Country Club and became quite an accomplished golfer. Because of this experience, he earned a golf scholarship to attend the University of Oregon. Wiley also attended Yakima Junior College and graduated from the University of Oregon followed by graduation from the University of Idaho School of Law.

After graduating college and law school, Wiley returned to Yakima where he began a long and distinguished legal career as a Deputy Prosecutor with the Yakima County Prosecuting Attorney's Office. There, he developed many close personal and professional relationships there and was highly respected as an extremely able trial attorney by attorneys and judges alike.

After nearly five years as a Deputy Prosecutor, Wiley went into private practice. After a short time as a junior associate with a local law firm, he became a partner as a trial lawyer. Wiley's law practice and prominence grew. He worked in many different areas of the law before focusing on Personal Injury and Labor and Industry claims. Wiley's legal skills grew and he successfully developed systems for more effectively handling cases. Other attorneys emulated his systems, and he ended up mentored many attorneys in developing their own legal practices. He developed many deep and meaningful lifelong friendships and professional associations.

Wiley Hurst and Associates was founded in 1989, focusing his practice to Personal Injury and Labor and Industry claims. In 1998 he partnered with Scott Brumback; and in 2001 the addition of Joseph Brusic created today's firm of Hurst Brumback & Brusic. Expanding their scope to include Social Security Disability claims, Wiley, Scott & Joe were able to help more people with severe disabilities.

Wiley's amazing strength and perseverance really shined through over the final years of his life. He battled through numerous health issues, more than anyone should have to endure. Through it all, Wiley maintained a positive attitude and gave it his all right up until the end. And for sure, Wiley, despite his hardships, acted with great grace and humility. He knew well what it was like to be disabled towards the end, just as many of his beloved clients knew too well in their own personal battles. Wiley passed away in February of 2013. He got the most out of every 24 hours of every day of his life. His motto was "anything worth doing is worth overdoing," and he certainly lived by it. He will be truly missed.